exrpan:

clmporg:

GET LIT
with CLMP & Lit Crawl NYC



Raise a glass with us on Tuesday, February 18th at Solas in the East Village as we celebrate our new collaboration with Lit Crawl NYC—a monthly (and roaming!) series of interactive literary events, curated by CLMP member publishers and your favorite bookish orgs. Our kickoff party is guest-hosted by the lovely folks at Electric Literature & Bodega, plus Tumblr’s Rachel Fershleiser (and author of eagerly awaited ‘zine #StockTips), as well as the writers behind two of this spring’s most hotly anticipated titles (we’re looking at you Lizzie Harris and Scott Cheshire).


What: A party. Plain and simple.

Where: Solas (upstairs), 232 E. 9th Street, NY, NY

When: 7:30pm until late!

Who: Bodega Magazine, Scott Cheshire (High as the Horses’ Bridles), Rachel Fershleiser (Tumblr), Lizzie Harris (Stop Wanting), Halimah Marcus (Electric Lit), Benjamin Samuel (Electric Lit), PLUS YOU!

In the next couple of weeks we’ll be releasing a form so that CLMP members can submit their event ideas to us directly. But before that’s set, if you’re interested in curating a GET LIT event, please email Julie Buntin (jbuntin@clmp.org). Or better yet, come to Solas on Tuesday, Feb 18th and pitch to us in person.

A joint project of Lit Crawl NYC and the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses (CLMP), GET LIT presents New York City’s reading (and fun-loving) public with monthly events that are smart, spirited and surprising. 


RSVP by email (clmporg@gmail.com) is strongly encouraged, though not required. Or RSVP on Facebook!

Come say hi to us!!!

"I find I’m more ready to discard pages than I used to be. I used to look for things to keep. I used to find ways to save a paragraph or a sentence, maybe by relocating it. Now I look for ways to discard things. If I discard a sentence I like, it’s almost as satisfying as keeping a sentence I like. I don’t think I’ve become ruthless or perverse—just a bit more willing to believe that nature will restore itself. The instinct to discard is finally a kind of faith. It tells me there’s a better way to do this page even though the evidence is not accessible at the present time."

— Don DeLillo (via mttbll)

(Source: theparisreview.org, via mttbll)

poetsorg:

More from Grant Snider.

poetsorg:

More from Grant Snider.

explore-blog:

Eudora Welty on writing – fine addition to our ongoing archive of wisdom on the craft.

explore-blog:

Eudora Welty on writing – fine addition to our ongoing archive of wisdom on the craft.

(Source: , via explore-blog)

"Life is sad. Here is someone."

— Lorrie Moore, Anagrams (via coffeeslut)

(via elliottholt)

penamerican:

A Message From Solitary Confinement

Kazakh poet Aron Atabek, serving an 18-year sentence in a maximum-security penitentiary, has been held in solitary confinement since his book, The Heart of Eurasia, was published while he was in jail. He was previously held in solitary confinement for two years from 2010 to 2012 for refusing to wear a prison uniform. His book, a mixture of poetry and prose and a blunt critique of President Nursultan Nazarbayev, was smuggled out of prison and published on the Internet in 2012. Atabek was again placed in solitary confinement in December 2012 after authorities discovered the breach, and will reportedly stay there until the end of 2014

penamerican:

A Message From Solitary Confinement

Kazakh poet Aron Atabek, serving an 18-year sentence in a maximum-security penitentiary, has been held in solitary confinement since his book, The Heart of Eurasia, was published while he was in jail. He was previously held in solitary confinement for two years from 2010 to 2012 for refusing to wear a prison uniform. His book, a mixture of poetry and prose and a blunt critique of President Nursultan Nazarbayev, was smuggled out of prison and published on the Internet in 2012. Atabek was again placed in solitary confinement in December 2012 after authorities discovered the breach, and will reportedly stay there until the end of 2014

National Book Chats With Gene Luen Yang, Longlisted for the 2013 YPL National Book Award

  • National Book Foundation: What is your favorite line or passage from Boxers & Saints?
  • Gene Luen Yang: I wrote a scene where my two main characters meet one another as young children. It appears in both books. Four-Girl, the protagonist of Saints, makes a face at Little Bao, the protagonist of Boxers. Little Bao becomes infatuated with her.
  • National Book Foundation: Why?
  • Gene Luen Yang: That's happened to me. I've become infatuated with girls who make faces at me.
flavorpill:

Contemporary Illustrations for Famous Novels

newyorker:

image

James Wood on Alice Munro’s Nobel Prize win: http://nyr.kr/19EtRit

"Many of Munro’s readers had sadly concluded that she was not, somehow, the kind of writer that the Nobel committee seemed to like; I had decided that she would join the list of noble non-Nobelists, a distinguished…

"Prove it. Take a boy who left the forest and became
evidence. Victor, until 12, knew only the sounds of rain on
leaves, on rock, on dirt—no voices down the hall. No voice
in the head. He entered the languaged world late and
learned: to be pleasant, to remember remembering, and two
phrases."

— from Critical Period Hypothesis, by Jennifer Kronovet, part of PEN’s Poetry Series (via penamerican)